Faculty Research

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    Boundary distributions with respect to Chebyshev's inequality
    (Science Publications, 2010) Bias, Peter; Hedman, Shawn; Rose, David
    Variables whose distributions achieve the boundary value of Chebyshev’s inequality are characterized and it is found that non-constant variables with this property are symmetric discrete with at most three values. Nevertheless, the bound of Chebyshev’s inequality remains optimal for the class of continuous variables.
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    Asset management in public DB and non-DB Pension Plans.
    (Cambridge University Press, 2016-10) Farrell, James; Shoag, Daniel
    State and local pension plans are increasingly moving from the traditional defined benefit (DB) model to non-DB models that generally allow for participant-directed investment. This shift has important implications for the management of the more than US$3 trillion in assets held to finance public employee retirement benefits. To investigate these implications, we introduce new data from a nationwide survey of public DB and non-DB plans and a unique data set on thousands of individual investors in the state of Florida's defined contribution (DC) plan. Using these sources, we explore how participant involvement in the public sector affects the distribution of asset class allocations, management fees, investment outcomes, and portfolio rebalancing at both the individual and aggregate levels. We found that there is little difference between the DB and non-DB plans in terms of asset mix, returns, and fees, except that DB plan have greater access and allocations to alternative investments. We also found that while the average individual DC plan participant allocated their asset similarly to the DB plan, black females and older white males, on average, invested on opposite tails of the risk spectrum. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]   Copyright of Journal of Pension Economics & Finance is the property of Cambridge University Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
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    THE IMPACT OF PERCEIVED CORPORATE AFFINITY FOR TECHNOLOGY ON SERVICE OUTCOMES: A SIGNALING THEORY PERSPECTIVE
    (Taylor & Francis Ltd, 2018) Fleming, David E.; Artis, Andrew B.; Harris, Eric G.; Solomon, Paul J.
    Congruity theory suggests that customers' attitudes toward technology limit the benefits service firms accrue from publicizing their technological relationship, but signaling theory suggests the opposite. Both are used to develop and test hypotheses regarding the relationships between customer perceptions of corporate affinity for technology (PCAFT) and service outcomes. The study reveals that there are differences between customer types. For traditional financial service customers, PCAFT is driven by customers' personal affinity for technology consistent with selective attention theory and PCAFT is positively related to service performance perceptions. For younger customers, personal affinity for technology moderates the link between PCAFT and service performance perceptions. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]   Copyright of Journal of Marketing Theory & Practice is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
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    The effects of the quality and quantity of education on income inequality
    (Springer, 2018-01) Hall, Joshua D.
    High levels of income inequality characterize both developed and developing countries. This paper focuses on how the quality of education, measured by international, standardized test scores, and the quantity of education, measured by the average years of school attainment, affect the distribution of income. Overall, both greater educational achievement and educational attainment reduce income inequality. The marginal effect, however, is stronger for increases the educational attainment when considering their interactive effects. This result is robust, and strengthened, when the focus is on only developing countries, and to the inclusion of additional factors attributed to the growth of inequality such as globalization, technological progress, the quality of institutions and educational spending. Considering only the quantity of education misses other important elements of education that contribute to explaining the dynamics of income inequality.
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    Measuring the Diffusion of Technologies Through International Trade.
    (Springer Nature, 2019-11) Hall, Joshua D.
    Technological advancements affect economic growth, income distribution and levels of unemployment. However, quantifying the pace of technological diffusion is problematic. This paper develops a new measure of technological progress by estimating the high-skill content of imports using industry-level, bilateral trade data. Intuitively, during periods of trade liberalization, a higher skill content embodied within imports will lead to a faster change in the arrival rate of new technologies. Trade accelerated since the 1980s and with that came a diffusion of new technologies into developing countries. By utilizing the industry-level trade data in conjunction with the high-skill factor content of each industry, a measure of technological diffusion is developed using a theoretically consistent gravity model. This measure is highly correlated with other measures of technological progress and provides a new data set for a large number of both developed and developing countries. How the high-skill content of imports increased is analyzed for countries across the development spectrum. This measure of technological progress is applied to income inequality. It significantly increases inequality, consistent with theoretical expectations, and provides an additional avenue in how to measure technological progress. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]   Copyright of International Advances in Economic Research is the property of Springer Nature and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)