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Responsiveness, minimal detectable change, and minimal clinically important difference of the sitting balance scale and function in sitting test in people with stroke

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dc.contributor.author Alzyoud, Jehad M.
dc.contributor.author Medley, Ann
dc.contributor.author Thomson, Mary
dc.contributor.author Csiza, Linda
dc.date.accessioned 2022-06-17T21:33:36Z
dc.date.available 2022-06-17T21:33:36Z
dc.date.issued 2022
dc.identifier.citation Alzyoud, J. M., Medley, A., Thompson, M., & Csiza, L. (2022). Responsiveness, minimal detectable change, and minimal clinically important difference of the sitting balance scale and function in sitting test in people with stroke. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 38(2), 327-336. https://doi.org/10.1080/09593985.2020.1756016 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32401095/
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11416/633
dc.description.abstract Background: Limited studies have examined the responsiveness of the Sitting Balance Scale (SBS) and Function in Sitting Test (FIST). No studies have investigated the psychometric properties of these tools in skilled nursing facilities. Objective: The purposes of the study were (1) to examine responsiveness of the SBS and FIST, in people with stroke, receiving rehabilitation in skilled nursing facilities; and (2) to estimate the MDC and MCID of these scales. Methods: Forty participants completed the FIST, SBS, and Barthel Index (BI) at admission and discharge. Internal responsiveness of the FIST and SBS was measured using Effect Size (ES) and Standardized Response Mean (SRM). Examining the association between the difference in scores on the SBS or FIST and the difference in scores on the BI determined external responsiveness. MDC and MCID were estimated for both measures. Results: The ES and the SRM for both scales were large (1.01–2.30) indicating excellent internal responsiveness. Both scales demonstrated satisfactory external responsiveness, showing good association with change in BI scores (p < .01). MDC90 of the SBS and the FIST were 2.3 and 3.9, respectively. Anchor-based MCID estimates were 4.5 and 3.5, and distribution-based were 3.5 and 4.8 for the SBS and FIST, respectively. Conclusions: Both scales demonstrate sufficient responsiveness in the skilled nursing setting. Our findings suggest a change of 5 on the SBS and 4 on the FIST are clinically important, and clinicians may use these values to assess patient progress. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Informa en_US
dc.subject Cerebrovascular disease--Patients en_US
dc.subject Sitting Balance Scale en_US
dc.subject Function in Sitting Test en_US
dc.title Responsiveness, minimal detectable change, and minimal clinically important difference of the sitting balance scale and function in sitting test in people with stroke en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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