Florida Southern College Digital Repository

“Sing me back home:” Using country music to clarify criminological theory in undergraduate courses

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Stogner, John
dc.contributor.author Slate, Risdon
dc.contributor.author Blankenship, Chastity
dc.contributor.author McKee, Jesse
dc.date.accessioned 2022-06-23T20:51:10Z
dc.date.available 2022-06-23T20:51:10Z
dc.date.issued 2022
dc.identifier.citation Stogner, J., Slate, R., Blankenship, C., & McKee, J. (2022). “Sing me back home:” Using country music to clarify criminological theory in undergraduate courses. Journal of Criminal Justice Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/10511253.2022.2058574 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=asn&AN=156315599&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=s5615486
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11416/642
dc.description.abstract The inclusion of music is central to early education pedagogy as an efficient means of conveying information and a mechanism for knowledge retention, yet these tools are generally omitted from higher educational approaches. Drawing on prior studies highlighting how musical assignments successfully supplemented traditional criminal justice coursework, a criminological theory course was redesigned with music as a core component. Musical selections were included and discussed in each class meeting as well as being tied to class assignments within a pilot course. Teaching techniques were refined over several semesters with the revised course framework including more student involvement, somewhat approaching a flipped classroom model whereby the instructor and students equally shared musical selections relevant to course curriculum. The instructor perceived students were more invested in the course. The professor-student dynamic also appeared to become more intimate due to both sharing music about which they were personally passionate. Further, the instructor’s inclusion of crime-specific songs from older musical genres appeared to disrupt students’ stereotypes associating crime with other genres and demographics. We offer a summary of the techniques for teaching a criminological theory course framed by instructor presentations of “outlaw” country music; guidance is also provided for utilizing other genres. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis en_US
dc.subject Criminology en_US
dc.subject Country music en_US
dc.subject College teaching en_US
dc.title “Sing me back home:” Using country music to clarify criminological theory in undergraduate courses en_US
dc.title.alternative Using country music to clarify criminological theory in undergraduate courses en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search


Browse

My Account