The impact of health education on physical activity correlates in college students.

Date
2021-01-24
Authors
Maldari, Monica M.
Garcia, Jeanette M.
Rice, David J.
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Abstract
Abstract Objective To examine the effects of a 15-week, conceptually based university health/wellness course on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels, psychosocial factors, and health-related fitness knowledge (HRFK). Participants: 125 undergraduates enrolled during spring 2016 semester. Methods: Participants completed pre- and post-course surveys with questions on MVPA levels, exercise self-efficacy (SE), exercise motivation, and HRFK. Wilcoxon rank sum tests examined changes in SE, motivation, and HFRK. A multiple regression analysis examined associations among HRFK, psychosocial factors, and MVPA. Results: HRFK and MVPA increased from baseline to post-course assessment (p<.01). An increase in SE was associated with an increase in MVPA (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Enrollment in a conceptually based health/wellness course may increase MVPA and HRFK in college students. Although the increase in SE post-course was not significant, it was associated with an increase in MVPA. These results support adoption of health/wellness programming to attenuate decreases in MVPA typically observed in college students. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
Description
Keywords
College students, Health education, Exercise
Citation
Maldari, M. M., Garcia, J. M., & Rice, D. J. (2021). The impact of health education on physical activity correlates in college students. Journal of American College Health. https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2021.1879812
DOI
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