THE IMPACT OF PERCEIVED CORPORATE AFFINITY FOR TECHNOLOGY ON SERVICE OUTCOMES: A SIGNALING THEORY PERSPECTIVE

Date
2018
Authors
Fleming, David E.
Artis, Andrew B.
Harris, Eric G.
Solomon, Paul J.
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Taylor & Francis Ltd
Abstract
Congruity theory suggests that customers' attitudes toward technology limit the benefits service firms accrue from publicizing their technological relationship, but signaling theory suggests the opposite. Both are used to develop and test hypotheses regarding the relationships between customer perceptions of corporate affinity for technology (PCAFT) and service outcomes. The study reveals that there are differences between customer types. For traditional financial service customers, PCAFT is driven by customers' personal affinity for technology consistent with selective attention theory and PCAFT is positively related to service performance perceptions. For younger customers, personal affinity for technology moderates the link between PCAFT and service performance perceptions. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]   Copyright of Journal of Marketing Theory & Practice is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
Description
Keywords
Consumers, Technology 
Citation
Fleming, D. E., Artis, A. B., Harris, E. G., & Solomon, P. J. (2018). The Impact of Perceived Corporate Affinity for Technology on Service Outcomes: A Signaling Theory Perspective. Journal of Marketing Theory & Practice, 26(3), 230–245. https://doi.org/10.1080/10696679.2017.1369127
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