Apocalypse How? Exploring the Use of Graphic Novelization in Neuroscience Pedagogy

Date
2019-04
Authors
Howard, Jordan R.
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Florida Southern College
Abstract
The use of graphic novelization is a great tool to aid classroom learning (e.g., Niebert, Marsch, & Treagust, 2012). There has been evidence to suggest that more biologically-oriented content may be difficult to grasp due to its complicated vocabulary, so the use of graphic novelization has been implemented as a pedagogical tool to assist students who have weaker backgrounds in the natural sciences (e.g., Aleixo, & Sumner, 2017; Hosler & Boomer, 2011). While previous work has shown that graphic novelization enhances such content, it is uncertain as to whether metaphors must be visually-based, as opposed to being word-based. In addition to exploring the effectiveness of metaphor types, this study looked at whether feedback from a short-term test influenced long-term retention, as well as the number of prior exposures to materials participants experienced. The current study incorporated the use of metaphors (in the form of a zombie apocalypse) to convey the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Results demonstrated that there was a significant memory benefit of graphic novel materials over the control condition, especially when questions assessed materials seen twice. These results imply that graphic novelization seems to be a promising method of disseminating information about neurodegenerative disorders.
Description
Honors thesis Spring 2019
Keywords
Graphic novels in education, Graphic novels, Metaphor, Education—Study and teaching, Nervous system—Degeneration, Feedback (Psychology)
Citation
DOI
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