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Ideology and Femininity in Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr. Moffitt
dc.contributor.author Bliss, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned 2021-05-06T23:36:23Z
dc.date.available 2021-05-06T23:36:23Z
dc.date.issued 2021-05
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11416/547
dc.description Honors Thesis Spring 2021 en_US
dc.description.abstract Between 1847 and 1848, the literary market of Victorian England convulsed under the influence of two novels from previously unknown authors: Currer Bell’s Jane Eyre and Ellis Bell’s Wuthering Heights. Known to a slightly smaller number was a novel by a third Bell: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, by Acton Bell. Despite the authors’ relative obscurity, these novels quickly drew popular attention—and incited controversy en_US
dc.publisher Florida Southern College en_US
dc.subject Femininity
dc.subject Femininity in literature
dc.subject Ideology in literature
dc.title Ideology and Femininity in Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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